by Charles R. Swindoll Scriptures: Deuteronomy 8:11-14; Matthew 24:12; Revelation 2:4-5 It happened in a large, seventy-five-year-old stone house on the west side of Houston. A massive stairway led up to several bedrooms. The den down below was done in rough-hewn boards with soft leather chairs and a couple of matching sofas. The wet bar had been converted into a small library, including a shelf of tape recordings and a multiple-speaker sound system. The ideal place to spend a weekend . . . unfortunately, my wife and I were there just for the evening. The smell of char-broiled T-bones drifted through the rooms. The ladiesRead More →

Songless Saints by Charles R. Swindoll 1 Chronicles 16:7-36; Psalm 30:9; 100:2; 149:1-5; Luke 19:40 I was on a scriptural safari. Prowling through the Ephesian letter, I was tracking an elusive, totally unrelated verse when God’s sharp sword flashed, suddenly slicing me to the core. . . . speaking to one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody with your heart to the Lord. (Ephesians 5:19) Everyone knows Ephesians 5:18, where we are told to “be filled with the Spirit” . . . but have you ever noticed that verse 18 ends with a comma, not a period? The next verse describes theRead More →

God’s Control by Charles R. Swindoll Isaiah 45:5-9; 46:8-11; Daniel 5:18-21 The bitter news of Dawson Trotman’s drowning swept like cold wind across Schroon Lake to the shoreline. Eyewitnesses tell of the profound anxiety, the tears, the helpless disbelief in the faces of those who now looked out across the deep blue water. Everyone’s face except one—Lila Trotman. Dawson’s widow. As she suddenly walked upon the scene a close friend shouted, “Oh, Lila . . . he’s gone. Dawson’s gone!” To that she replied in calm assurance the words of Psalm 115:3: But our God is in the heavens; He does whatever He pleases. All of the anguish,Read More →

Stumbling by Charles R. Swindoll Psalm 37:23-24; Hebrews 4:12-16 Nothing damages our dignity like stumbling! I have seen people, dressed to the hilt, stumble and fall flat on their faces as they were walking to church. I have witnessed serious and gifted soloists, stepping up to the pulpit with music in hand, stumble and fall as the sheets of music sailed like maple leaves in an October breeze. I’ve watched a sure and winning touchdown by a fleet split-end—nobody within fifteen yards—foiled by a stumble. I’ve looked on as brides and grooms stumbled in unison . . . as bandsmen stumbled in formation . . . as shoppers stumbled in stores . . .Read More →

Quietness by Charles R. Swindoll Psalm 46; 131; Isaiah 30:15–18; Mark 6:30–32 It is almost 10:00, Monday night. The children are snoozing and snoring upstairs (or they should be!). Aside from a few outside noises—a passing car . . . a barking dog . . . a few, faint voices in the distance—all’s quiet on the home front. That wonderful, much-needed presence has again come for a visit—quietness. Oh, how I love it . . . how I need it. One of my most poignant memories of quietness occurred in California when I was walking with a friend along the sandy shores at Carmel. TheRead More →

by Charles R. Swindoll September 25, 2015 Hebrews 11:16 Like silent shadows, the heroes of the faith pass beside us, pointing us toward the upward way, whispering words of courage. The memory of all those models of righteousness now gone from view puts needed steel in our spirit, prompting us to press forward, always forward. The legacy of their powerful presence and penetrating pages adds depth to our otherwise superficial existence. Because their convictions live on in words that challenge today’s shallow thinking, we do not—we dare not—remain the same. I would challenge you to do some further reading about these heroes of the faith.Read More →

by Charles R. Swindoll September 24, 2015 Romans 5 It doesn’t take a Rhodes scholar to guess the country, though the towns may sound strange: Offenbach, Darmstadt, Mannheim, Coburg, Heidelberg, Worms. . . . The land of beer steins, sauerkraut, liverwurst, and black bread; cuckoo clocks and overflowing flower boxes; wide, winding rivers and deep green woods; stone castles on hillsides and quiet, efficient trains; and the greatest music ever written. The beloved homeland of Bach, Mendelssohn, Handel, Beethoven, and Wagner. Germany is also where some of the severest yet most essential battles for the faith were fought. It was there that the chain that bound the BibleRead More →

by Charles R. Swindoll Philippians 4:13–14 I honestly believe that “forgetting” is the hardest part of “forgiving.” Forgetting is something shared with no other person. It’s a solo flight. And all the rewards are postponed until eternity . . . but how great they will be on that day! Forgetting requires the servant to think correctly which means our full focus must be on the Lord and not on humanity. By God’s grace, it can happen. Ask yourself these two questions: Is there someone or something I have refused to forget, which keeps me from being happy and productive? Am I a victim of self-pity,Read More →

by Charles R. Swindoll Proverbs 22:6 Maybe it’s because I’m soon to have another birthday. Maybe it’s because I’m a granddad several times over. Or maybe it’s because of a struggling young seminarian I met recently who wishes he had been higher on his parents’ priority list than, say, fifth or sixth. He was hurried and ignored through childhood, then tolerated and misunderstood through adolescence, and finally expected to “be a man” without having been taught how. My words are dedicated to all of you who have the opportunity to make an investment in a growing child so that he or she might someday beRead More →

Stories by Charles R. Swindoll Matthew 13 Stories transport us into another world. They hold our attention. They become remarkable vehicles for the communication of truth and meaningful lessons that cannot be easily forgotten. If a picture is better than a thousand words, a story is better than a million! Some of the best stories are those spun from everyday life or from our past. Family histories are held together and handed down from generation to generation in stories. And these strong cords of memory actually become the ties that bind. Biographies drip with interesting accounts worth passing on. For example, Human Options by theRead More →